Matthew 8-9 Always Trust Christ

            ALWAYS TRUST CHRIST
    Matthew 8:1-9:34      September 23 2007

    This section of Matthew contains multiple stories of Jesus’
    power over various challenges in life. That Jesus surmounted
    them all invites us to trust Him in all circumstances.
    After recording the Sermon on the Mount (Matt. 5:1-7:29),
    Matthew chronicled three miracles of healing that
    demonstrated slightly different aspects of Jesus’ power. The
    cleansing of the leper (Matt.8:1-3) demonstrated Jesus’ power
    over one of the worst maladies of the day.
    The healing of the centurion’s servant (Matt. 8:4-13) showed
    Jesus did not need to be physically present to heal. At
    Capernaum, Jesus cast out demons (Matt. 8:14-17), thus
    demonstrating His sovereign power over evil.
    A scribe’s claim he would follow Jesus wherever He went
    became the occasion to illustrate the true nature of
    discipleship (Matt. 8:18-22).True discipleship is defined by
    trust in Jesus , no matter what the circumstances may be.
The next two miracles, the stilling of the storm (Matt. 8:23-27) and the two men possessed by multiple demons (Matt.8:28-34), illustrate Jesus’ power over nature itself and over the most extensive and entrenched evil.
    Forgiveness of sin is God’s work. Thus when Jesus
demonstrated He had the ability to forgive the paralytic, in addition to having the ability to heal, He made a highly significant claim (Matt. 9:1-8).
    The call of Matthew the tax collector (Matt. 9:9) and the
    fellowship with tax collectors and sinners (Matt. 9:10-13) 
    illustrates Jesus’ openness to all people . He wants to help all
    kinds of people; therefore all kinds of people can come to Him.
The question of fasting (Matt. 9:14-17)  illustrates the newness of Jesus’ ministry and the joy associated with Him. The healing of the young girl, the woman with an issue of blood
    (Matt. 9:18-26), and the two blind men (Matt. 9:27-31) again
    demonstrate Jesus’ compassion for people in difficult
    situations.
    The final narrative in this section, that of driving out of the
    demon(Matt. 9:32-34). was a further occasion for
    condemnation by the Pharisees. They accused Jesus of being
    in league with Satan and their opposition became more firm
    and deadly.

    1. When You Are Ailing (Matt. 8:1-3)

Matt. 8:1   When he came down from the mountainside, large
crowds followed him.  8:2   A man with leprosy came and knelt
before him and said, “Lord, if you are willing, you can make me
clean.” 8:3   Jesus reached out his hand and touched the man.
“I am willing,” he said. “Be clean!” Immediately he was cured
of his leprosy.

    The Cleansing of the Leper (Matt.8:1-3) demonstrated Jesus’
     power over one of the worst maladies of the day.
     Leprosy. ( Lev 13-14). Make me clean. Leprosy made a person
    ceremonially unclean as well as physically afflicted
    ( Luke 5:12-16).
    Don’t tell anyone. Perhaps for several reasons: (1) Jesus did
    not want to be considered just a miracle worker, (2) he did
    not want his teaching ministry hindered by too much publicity
     being given to his healing miracles, and (3) he did not want
    his death to come prematurely,  before he had finished his
    ministry. (Matt.9:30; 12:16; Mark 1:44; 5:43; 7:36; Luke 8:56).
    Show yourself to the priest. ( Luke 5:14). THEM. The priests.

    2. When You Are In Danger (Matt. 8:23-27)

Matt. 8:23   Then he got into the boat and his disciples followed
him. 8:24   Without warning, a furious storm came up on the lake,
so that the waves swept over the boat. But Jesus was sleeping.
8:25   The disciples went and woke him, saying, “Lord, save us!
We’re going to drown!” 8:26   He replied, “You of little faith, why
are you so afraid?” Then he got up and rebuked the winds and the
waves, and it was completely calm. 8:27   The men were amazed
and asked, “What kind of man is this? Even the winds and the
waves obey him!”

The next two miracles, the stilling of the storm (Matt. 8:23-27) and the two men possessed by multiple demons (Matt.8:28-34), illustrate Jesus’ power over nature itself and over the most extensive and entrenched evil.
    Furious storm. (Mark 4:37). But Jesus was sleeping. (Luke 8:23).
    Region of the Gadarenes. The region around the city of Gadara,
six miles southeast of the Sea of Galilee. Mark and Luke identify the region by the capital city Gerasa, located about 35 miles southeast of the Sea. TWO. (Mark 5:2) and (Luke 8:27) mention only one Gadarene demoniac.

    3. When You Need Forgiveness (Matt. 9:1-8)

Matt. 9:1   Jesus stepped into a boat, crossed over and came to his
own town. 9:2   Some men brought to him a paralytic, lying on a mat.
When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, “Take heart,
son; your sins are forgiven.”  9:3   At this, some of the teachers of
the law said to themselves, “This fellow is blaspheming!” 9:4  
Knowing their thoughts, Jesus said, “Why do you entertain evil
thoughts in your hearts? 9:5   Which is easier: to say, ‘Your sins
are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Get up and walk’? 9:6   But so that you
may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive
sins. . . .” Then he said to the paralytic, “Get up, take your mat and
go home.” 9:7   And the man got up and went home. 9:8   When the
crowd saw this, they were filled with awe; and they praised God,
who had given such authority to men.

Forgiveness of sin is God’s work. Thus when Jesus demonstrated He had the ability to forgive the paralytic, in addition to having the ability to heal, He made a highly significant claim (Matt. 9:1-8).
    His own town. Capernaum (Matt.4:13).
Blaspheming. Here the term includes usurping God’s prerogative to forgive sins (Mark 2:7).

        Summary:

The final narrative in this section, that of driving out of the demon(Matt. 9:32-34). was a further occasion for
    condemnation by the Pharisees. They accused Jesus of being
    in league with Satan and their opposition became more firm
    and deadly.
Forgiveness of sin remains our for most need but it is often accepted and then forgotten – as we concern ourselves with other needs such as physical health and protection from danger. While these needs are legitimate, we must always be thankful for forgiveness and the fact that it enables our relationship to God.